A new excerpt from Johannes Göransson’s The Sugar Book has been featured over at The Fanzine.

A new excerpt from Johannes Göransson’s The Sugar Book has been featured over at The Fanzine.

from David Lynch’s The Air Is on Fire

“Kate Durbin is pop culture’s stenographer. E! Entertainment ingeniously peers inside the television static, revealing the many fictions that make up our reality, and the many realities which make up our fictions. It’s also a lot of fun to read. I love it.”

—Heidi Montag, star of MTV’s The Hills


E! Entertainment is forthcoming from Wonder (May 2014)

My adventurous friend Karter (aka Sol Persona) is currently in the works of recording his first EP. His debut music video, "Leaving is a Metaphor for Everything" was just released today. (Directed by Angelo Re)

The experimentally minded Sol Persona project seems interested in reinvigorating music by foregrounding various constructions of subjecthood and the various rigors of the human condition. Sol Persona’s compositions are magnetic and ethereal; they’re often elaborate, mosaic-like compositions seemingly concerned with reconstructing love, beauty, and identity. I think his fusion of chaotic tenderness and green refuge will prove to be a daring game changer. I think he has the necessary vocals when it comes to prosecuting any king-side attacks.

(He also has great hair.)

Looking forward to the EP.

"… this collection could be labeled ‘experimental’, but only insofar as trans* bodies are consistently maligned as ‘experimental’. If the work herein tends to move outside of convention, it is less due to a pretense of ‘challenging our audience’ than of challenging normative meanings mobilized against other ways of making sense. What follows is less an ‘experiment’ in form as a documentation of bodies, interrogating the different ways we come to understand, desire and survive” -Jos CharlesTHEM Is. 1 features work from:
Boston Davis Bostian, Brody Wood, Calvin Gimpelevich, Cassady Bee, Codi Suzanne Oliver  &  Willow Healey, Gr Keer, Grey Vild, H. Melt, Janani Balasubramanian, j/j hastain, Joy Ladin, Levi Sable, Lucas Scheelk, Mx Glass      reba overkill, Rex Leonowicz, Stephen Ira, Van Binfa

"… this collection could be labeled ‘experimental’, but only insofar as trans* bodies are consistently maligned as ‘experimental’. If the work herein tends to move outside of convention, it is less due to a pretense of ‘challenging our audience’ than of challenging normative meanings mobilized against other ways of making sense. What follows is less an ‘experiment’ in form as a documentation of bodies, interrogating the different ways we come to understand, desire and survive” -Jos Charles

THEM Is. 1 features work from:

Boston Davis Bostian, Brody Wood, Calvin Gimpelevich, Cassady Bee, Codi Suzanne Oliver  &  Willow Healey, Gr Keer, Grey Vild, H. Melt, Janani Balasubramanian, j/j hastain, Joy Ladin, Levi Sable, Lucas Scheelk, Mx Glass      reba overkill, Rex Leonowicz, Stephen Ira, Van Binfa

Wifredo Lam’s The Jungle, 1943. Gouache on paper mounted on canvas, 94 1/4 x 90 1/2 in. Inter-American Fund, The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Wifredo Lam’s The Jungle, 1943. Gouache on paper mounted on canvas, 94 1/4 x 90 1/2 in. Inter-American Fund, The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Wifredo Lam’s Birth (Nativity), 1947. Oil on canvas, 86 x 39 3/4 in.Private Collection, San Juan, Puerto Rico

Wifredo Lam’s Birth (Nativity), 1947. Oil on canvas, 86 x 39 3/4 in.
Private Collection, San Juan, Puerto Rico

Stumbled across some pretty discomforting poems from a poet named Ronnie Peltier over at Gobbet.don’t force my hands onto thatface and around these chest hair mouthsoh you say mousta-chewell check this creakinggap in my teeth for any detritusfrom that neighborhood kid

Stumbled across some pretty discomforting poems from a poet named Ronnie Peltier over at Gobbet.

don’t force my hands onto that
face and around these chest hair mouths
oh you say mousta-che
well check this creaking
gap in my teeth for any detritus
from that neighborhood kid

Now, I’d just like to make a few points:

1) we all know that Terry Richardson is absolute slime. His camera is, essentially, a murder weapon. Possibly one of the worst human beings currently living. If there’s any guy out there making sure that rape culture stays healthy and well-fertilized, it’s that fucker.

2) we can get mad at pop music all we want. we can complain about Miley Cyrus—call her a whiny, spoiled little idiot all we want. but without pop music, how else would these numerous complications arise? Why are people so afraid of talking through things? Miley has been victimized by an incredibly masculine, incredibly white and privileged heteronormative machine of hypersexuality. Her victimization is seen as “cool” and “trendy” or just something “to talk or laugh about.” Both men and women don’t see this pop celebrity as a victim. This person “deserves what she gets.” This person who told Jimmy Kimmel that the only thing she knows how to do—in life—is perform. How are people not distressed by this? That goes for countless other celebrities too. Why is Anna Nicole Smith an ‘idiot?’ Why is Amanda Bynes an ‘idiot?’ Why is Rihanna an ‘idiot?’ Why is Lady Gaga an ‘idiot?’ Why is Lindsay Lohan an ‘idiot?’ Why do we view these human beings as idiots? Why don’t we see these human beings as victims of elaborate, piggish testosterone? As victims of a boardroom butcher? Instead, both men and women—on Facebook, on twitter, etc. continue to devour their skin and skin color as nothing more than gossip rags…

we exist in a time and a culture in which the only thing ‘in vogue’ is “damage”

3) finally, think about the ‘Wrecking Ball’ music video. if that was a naked ‘guy’ swinging back and forth on a wrecking ball—or if that was a ‘guy’ in his underwear licking a sledgehammer, would it be “slutty” … or would it be “funny” or “hilarious” or just “sexy” or just “stupid?”

if you’re going to shit-talk anyone on facebook—shit-talk Billy Ray. just shit-talk all the Billy Rays out there

"I have a longing to recount to you, the pleasure that I find in watching, without stirring from my table, a boy who each day at the same hour comes to lean out a window on the rue d’Alleray. At nine o’clock he opens the window, he wears a small blue bathtowel, or similarly blue underwear; he leans his head on his arms, burying his face in his elbow … hunting for dreams extremely strong, intense, exhausting, leaving him in a great (flute, more blue paper) despondency … And then briskly, he stands up, he sits down at a table where he must read? Write? Type? I do not know; I only see the naked elbow and shoulder; and I ask myself what dreams his eyes have drawn from the fold of his arms, what words or drawings can burst forth; but I tell myself that I am the only one to have seen, from the outside, taking shape and losing shape, the graceful chrysalis where they were born. This morning the window remained closed; in place of which I am writing to you."

-from a letter Michel Foucault wrote to Hervé Guibert on July 28, 1983

I have a (long) poem in the latest issue of A capella Zoo. It’s called “Into Magma Town.”Issue 9 features new poetry by Benjamin Clark, Jeanine Deibel, Meaghan Hope, Vanessa Lessel, Jeff Pearson, Dylan Platz, Colin Winnette, and Changming Yuan. There’s also new fiction by Rachel Adams, Brenda Anderson, Anton Baer, Redfern Barrett, Matthew Blasi, Victorya Chase, Julie Day, M. W. Fowler, Faith Gardner, Collin Blair Grabarek, Sam Grieve, Katherine Marzinsky, Faith Schantz, and Shellie Zacharia.I love the cover art too!—it’s by Devin Meldrum.

I have a (long) poem in the latest issue of A capella Zoo. It’s called “Into Magma Town.”

Issue 9 features new poetry by Benjamin Clark, Jeanine Deibel, Meaghan Hope, Vanessa Lessel, Jeff Pearson, Dylan Platz, Colin Winnette, and Changming Yuan.

There’s also new fiction by Rachel Adams, Brenda Anderson, Anton Baer, Redfern Barrett, Matthew Blasi, Victorya Chase, Julie Day, M. W. Fowler, Faith Gardner, Collin Blair Grabarek, Sam Grieve, Katherine Marzinsky, Faith Schantz, and Shellie Zacharia.

I love the cover art too!—it’s by Devin Meldrum.

Blake Butler actually interviewed David Byrne. YES!!

Blake Butler actually interviewed David Byrne. YES!!

Adophe Bouguereau’s Dante and Virgil in Hell (1850)

Adophe Bouguereau’s Dante and Virgil in Hell (1850)