Drew Kalbach makes his debut over at FANZINE with a review of Lauren Shufran’s Inter Arma:"These lines hinge around the ‘thyrsis,’ who is a character in Virgil and is linked with the pastoral poem. However, in the first poem, it is spelled ‘thyrsus,’ which is a kind of fennel rod, and makes a lot of sense given the overwhelming cock and sexual imagery. It’s this sort of subtle mutation from poem to poem, a slight twist in vowel or consonant, which gives these poems their slowly squirming feel. Along with that, the poems deal with sexuality in violent and multifaceted ways. For example, pious in public but depraved in private, Shufran links the Roman’s daily double-consciousness with the typical homophobic American male to emphasize both its absurd nature and its hateful ubiquity. In public, the military hates anything outside their tiny in-bred world; however, in private, all those ducks line up together to call each other a ‘fag.’ They love their cocks and ‘seizing flesh like they were taking pictures.’ Meanwhile, the duckish narrator flits in and through these scenes, dropping classic references and speaking in meter. He seems a part of and beyond it all."[Read More]

Drew Kalbach makes his debut over at FANZINE with a review of Lauren Shufran’s Inter Arma:

"These lines hinge around the ‘thyrsis,’ who is a character in Virgil and is linked with the pastoral poem. However, in the first poem, it is spelled ‘thyrsus,’ which is a kind of fennel rod, and makes a lot of sense given the overwhelming cock and sexual imagery. It’s this sort of subtle mutation from poem to poem, a slight twist in vowel or consonant, which gives these poems their slowly squirming feel. Along with that, the poems deal with sexuality in violent and multifaceted ways. For example, pious in public but depraved in private, Shufran links the Roman’s daily double-consciousness with the typical homophobic American male to emphasize both its absurd nature and its hateful ubiquity. In public, the military hates anything outside their tiny in-bred world; however, in private, all those ducks line up together to call each other a ‘fag.’ They love their cocks and ‘seizing flesh like they were taking pictures.’ Meanwhile, the duckish narrator flits in and through these scenes, dropping classic references and speaking in meter. He seems a part of and beyond it all."

[Read More]