actionbookspress:

"At its best moments, In the Moremarrow finds the essence of the source poems & rewrites itself with that same idiosyncratic element, letting itself grow into a new poem that is essentially the same as its progenitor, but also ‘more.’ There are several of these best moments. The majority of the book is such best moments
I think this book is extremely important. Both to expose us to Girondo’s work & to get us thinking about translation. Action Books has a knack for finding works like this.”-Jared Joseph via HTML Giant[Click here] to read the full article

actionbookspress:

"At its best moments, In the Moremarrow finds the essence of the source poems & rewrites itself with that same idiosyncratic element, letting itself grow into a new poem that is essentially the same as its progenitor, but also ‘more.’ There are several of these best moments. The majority of the book is such best moments

I think this book is extremely important. Both to expose us to Girondo’s work & to get us thinking about translation. Action Books has a knack for finding works like this.”

-Jared Joseph via HTML Giant



[Click here] to read the full article

teenagehallucination:

Poetry Spots: Dennis Cooper reads “Dear Todd”

(Source: youtube.com, via richardchiem)

This one time, I rewrote a popular Romanian fairy tale known as “The Golden Stag”. Then, a really wonderful new publication—ƒault, hue—accepted it for publication. This debut issue was edited by Jos Charles and I couldn’t be more pleased with it! Huge, huge thanks to Jos!!

Download the PDF or view it online:

radioactivemoat:

Here comes number two! (Flooding your screens this March!)

radioactivemoat:

Here comes number two! (Flooding your screens this March!)

queertone:

limazululdn:

image

QUEER CITY VHS: Lo-Res clips from vibrant queer life in NY, Manchester and Berlin, 1984-1994


The idea of homonationalism, coined by Jasbir Puar, has gained much ground recently with queer activist and academics. Homonationalism “refers to an understanding and enactment of…

Through a Glass Darkly (1961)

actionbookspress:

Friends, it’s time you rendezvous with us in Seattle! Action Books and Dorothy, a Publishing Project has an intense evening of readings planned for you: Valerie Mejer, C.D. Wright, Don Mee Choi, Suzanne Scanlon, and Amina Cain.

[Click] for more details. See you there!

radioactivemoat:

Today, in an elaborate Fanzine article called, “Let the Self-Destruction Continue,” Joe Hall shared with us his textually self-destructive findings after traveling deep into the archives at SUNY Buffalo. He even gave a shout-out to Russ and Carrie’s chapbook, rootpoems:"Other magazines and small publications work to directly engage readers with processes of vegetal growth and entropy. Radioactive Moat Press printed and shipped Carrie Lorig and Russ Wood’s 2013 chapbook rootpoems with a packet of ‘mystery seeds.’ In 1968 Graham Mackintosh published Richard Brautigan’s Please Plant This Book.Brautigan’s poems were printed on a set of seed packets which might be sown into a salad garden. It’s an optimistic book published in a tumultuous year: ‘In this spring of 1968 with the last / third of the Twentieth Century / traveling like a dream towards its / end, it is the time to plant books, / to pass them into the ground, so that / flowers and vegetables may grow / from these pages’ (from ‘California Native Flowers’). It asks you to read it before it obsolesces. Printed on the packets: ‘Packed for the / 1968-1969 Season.’”

radioactivemoat:

Today, in an elaborate Fanzine article called, “Let the Self-Destruction Continue,” Joe Hall shared with us his textually self-destructive findings after traveling deep into the archives at SUNY Buffalo. He even gave a shout-out to Russ and Carrie’s chapbook, rootpoems:


"Other magazines and small publications work to directly engage readers with processes of vegetal growth and entropy. Radioactive Moat Press printed and shipped Carrie Lorig and Russ Wood’s 2013 chapbook rootpoems with a packet of ‘mystery seeds.’ In 1968 Graham Mackintosh published Richard Brautigan’s Please Plant This Book.


Brautigan’s poems were printed on a set of seed packets which might be sown into a salad garden. It’s an optimistic book published in a tumultuous year: ‘In this spring of 1968 with the last / third of the Twentieth Century / traveling like a dream towards its / end, it is the time to plant books, / to pass them into the ground, so that / flowers and vegetables may grow / from these pages’ (from ‘California Native Flowers’). It asks you to read it before it obsolesces. Printed on the packets: ‘Packed for the / 1968-1969 Season.’”

actionbookspress:

"Seems like a lot of issues of translation have come up recently: Don Mee Choi’s note that she – the translator – wasn’t mentioned in the review of Kim Hyesoon’s All the Garbage; the Lucas Klein post I linked to below; C. Dale Young discussion about the claim that American writers are insular and don’t read work in translation (judging from the commentary to that link, they’re not only not reading works in translation but also totally unwilling to have a discussion about them not reading things in translation); and Coldfront Magazine’s ‘top 40 poetry books of 2014' which didn’t include a *single* work in translation (there’s no ethical responsibility to read works in translation, but lets think about what it means that you think all 40 best books of 2013 were by Americans!). I guess I’ll have to write something about this… Just when I thought Lawrence Venuti was outdated…”

[Click Here] for Johannes’s full article

"Jean-Michel Basquiat, Reclining Nude"
actionbookspress:

Deborah Schwartz published this incredible review of Kim Hyesoon’s ALL THE GARBAGE OF THE WORLD, UNITE! (translated by Don Mee Choi) over at The Critical Flame: A Journal of Literature & Culture:
Kim Hyesoon’s 132-page translated collection All the Garbage of the World, Unite! contains a poetry that is not built on metaphysical or metaphoric associations. An object, image, or process does not have to carry the weight of transmigration to or from another. No coherent, unified meaning about the nature of spirit and its existence in our physical bodies and our conquered and conquering nation-bodies are revealed in this collection (though for an attentive reading of how spirit inundates Kim’s reified landscapes see Tim VanDyke’s “This is the Ek-Static City: Thoughts on Kim Hyesoon’s Poetry and Poetics” in HTMLGIANT). Hacked open, bled, stained, dropped onto and into, peeled back, merged with, eaten up, shit on, devoured, tortured and nurtured by one another, sometimes all at the same time, sometimes in recurring cycles, things in these poems work and are worked upon by other things:

Under the faucet a man peeled a woman’s skinThe woman cacklecackled and peeled easily like an onionAs a layer of dark night peeled off transparent day soaredBlood draindrained down a pipeLike the mushy inside of a fresh eggSomeone cried, stopitstopit why are you all acting this way?When day gets suckled the sadtastingspicytasting night soarsDay and night kept this up for a thousand ten thousand years, for alleternityyet the woman peeled layerafterlayer…After I was all peeled like an onion, I wasn’t there anymorebut the I that used to call me I was hiding somewhereNight hid and trembled under the wood floor after taking its spicy skinyet the sea endlessly took off and put on a pair of pantsand yet it was hotinsummer and coldinwinter and everything drifted awayisn’tthisthemostbeautifulstoryintheworld?

actionbookspress:

Deborah Schwartz published this incredible review of Kim Hyesoon’s ALL THE GARBAGE OF THE WORLD, UNITE! (translated by Don Mee Choi) over at The Critical Flame: A Journal of Literature & Culture:


Kim Hyesoon’s 132-page translated collection All the Garbage of the World, Unite! contains a poetry that is not built on metaphysical or metaphoric associations. An object, image, or process does not have to carry the weight of transmigration to or from another. No coherent, unified meaning about the nature of spirit and its existence in our physical bodies and our conquered and conquering nation-bodies are revealed in this collection (though for an attentive reading of how spirit inundates Kim’s reified landscapes see Tim VanDyke’s “This is the Ek-Static City: Thoughts on Kim Hyesoon’s Poetry and Poetics” in HTMLGIANT). Hacked open, bled, stained, dropped onto and into, peeled back, merged with, eaten up, shit on, devoured, tortured and nurtured by one another, sometimes all at the same time, sometimes in recurring cycles, things in these poems work and are worked upon by other things:

Under the faucet a man peeled a woman’s skin
The woman cacklecackled and peeled easily like an onion
As a layer of dark night peeled off transparent day soared
Blood draindrained down a pipe
Like the mushy inside of a fresh egg
Someone cried, stopitstopit why are you all acting this way?
When day gets suckled the sadtastingspicytasting night soars
Day and night kept this up for a thousand ten thousand years, for all
eternity
yet the woman peeled layerafterlayer…
After I was all peeled like an onion, I wasn’t there anymore
but the I that used to call me I was hiding somewhere
Night hid and trembled under the wood floor after taking its spicy skin
yet the sea endlessly took off and put on a pair of pants
and yet it was hotinsummer and coldinwinter and everything drifted away
isn’tthisthemostbeautifulstoryintheworld?

actionbookspress:

Johannes writes, "Stephen Crane is one of my all time favorite poets. He’s better known as a journalist (he’s said to have written Black Riders and Other Lines on little scraps while out reporting) and a prose writer, the naturalist author of Maggie: A Girl of the Street and The Red Badge of Courage (the poems might suggest some interesting revision of Realism). But for me the poems are very evocative – at times his free verse seems so lazy that they’re about to fall apart (and this is also part of their amazing radicalness when you consider that they first poems were published in 1895); they are ‘lines’ according to Crane, barely even poems. They are little parables or allegories. In many ways they remind me of Henry Parland’s poems from thirty years later and across the Atlantic (I suspect the connection is French poetry).”

[Click] to read the poems

jessedraxler:

a while back Neave Bozorgi sent me a grip of photos to work with in the spirit of collaboration. recently I have been getting around to experimenting with them. somewhere along the way I created this gif. expect to see some more of the work I’ve been creating with his photos soon. 

jessedraxler:

a while back Neave Bozorgi sent me a grip of photos to work with in the spirit of collaboration. recently I have been getting around to experimenting with them. somewhere along the way I created this gif. expect to see some more of the work I’ve been creating with his photos soon. 

atlanteanpoets:

Florentino y el diablo, by Alberto Arvelo Torrealba

image

Porphyria

[Stage right, a table and stool. Here is seated PORPHYRIA, slumping, in her work clothes and work hair. She is a coatcheck girl at Club Nectarine. Downstage from her, PROLOGUE. Stage left, a ramp represents a…

actionbookspress:

"I recently finished Lara Glenum’s Pop Corpse. The book is sly, slick and out-of-this-world. A post-apocalyptic athletic performance. The language was poppin’! She was scramblin’ some eggs. Real cool.”

-Manuel Paul López, author of The Yearning Feed