psychokandi:

Stunning anatomic dresses from  Shih Chien University‘s fashion students exhibition. 

(via oh-live)

“PQRS is a mess of genre, mixed media, and script; it is both part poem and part critical essay. In his notes, Patrick Durgin explicitly states that sections of this piece were taken from his other works, lifted wholesale and placed after the speaking colon. This is a kind of conceptualism: take the genre and fill it until it exceeds its own boundaries and becomes something else, or something several. 
What does it mean when our work is easily archived, searched, collated, cut apart, pasted back together, quantified, shared, compressed, leaked, and otherwise shifted from one place to another? Its materiality is questioned, since material things aren’t supposed to be that mutable, although maybe that’s naive. Still, what does it mean when our genres are wholly pierced through and bled out? According to PQRS, it means nothing. Or, it means only possibility. In this demi-play, Durgin uses the form of a play’s speaking action to build deep trenches between what is being said, who is doing the speaking, and the origin of those words.”[Click] to read Drew’s full article via Fanzine

PQRS is a mess of genre, mixed media, and script; it is both part poem and part critical essay. In his notes, Patrick Durgin explicitly states that sections of this piece were taken from his other works, lifted wholesale and placed after the speaking colon. This is a kind of conceptualism: take the genre and fill it until it exceeds its own boundaries and becomes something else, or something several.

What does it mean when our work is easily archived, searched, collated, cut apart, pasted back together, quantified, shared, compressed, leaked, and otherwise shifted from one place to another? Its materiality is questioned, since material things aren’t supposed to be that mutable, although maybe that’s naive. Still, what does it mean when our genres are wholly pierced through and bled out? According to PQRS, it means nothing. Or, it means only possibility. In this demi-play, Durgin uses the form of a play’s speaking action to build deep trenches between what is being said, who is doing the speaking, and the origin of those words.”

[Click] to read Drew’s full article via Fanzine

you’re invited. cosmic wolves and poems. and prose.

you’re invited. cosmic wolves and poems. and prose.

actionbookspress:

Johannes writes, "This past weekend I went to Detroit to give a reading at the Salt and Cedar press, and it got me to thinking about ‘ruin porn’ again, a pet topic of mine. As probably all of you know, ‘ruin porn’ is the phrase used to condemn beautiful photographs of the ruins of Detroit (though I’ve also seen it on a local level, photographs of the ruins of South Bend at the local museum interestingly)"[Click] to continue reading

actionbookspress:

Johannes writes, "This past weekend I went to Detroit to give a reading at the Salt and Cedar press, and it got me to thinking about ‘ruin porn’ again, a pet topic of mine. As probably all of you know, ‘ruin porn’ is the phrase used to condemn beautiful photographs of the ruins of Detroit (though I’ve also seen it on a local level, photographs of the ruins of South Bend at the local museum interestingly)"

[Click] to continue reading

actionbookspress:

In case you didn’t know Abe Smith has all the genius. If you’re wondering where it went."why how did we how come move the sweet confidant campfire into the sweeter nested into the sweeter rests of the dead and dig a cave there and roast the cruel the missteppers there  pretty pretty beautiful in their fuego throes gifted feathers answer dark hair attention bolt gold roots of fire foretell the flower garden gonzo with not meant surprised that’s not mint? rune o’ wild onion “[Click] to continue reading

actionbookspress:

In case you didn’t know Abe Smith has all the genius. If you’re wondering where it went.

"why how did we how come move the sweet confidant campfire

into the sweeter nested into the sweeter rests of the dead

and dig a cave there

and roast the cruel the missteppers there

pretty pretty beautiful in their fuego throes

gifted feathers answer dark

hair attention bolt gold

roots of fire foretell the flower

garden gonzo with not meant

surprised that’s not mint? rune o’ wild onion “

[Click] to continue reading

actionbookspress:

Friends, here’s the 2006 debut that started it all. Volume 1, Issue 1 of Action, Yes featured Aase Berg poems (trans. by Johannes Göransson) accompanied by Tom Benson collages, five “multi-celled” poems by Crystal Curry, some apocalypse poems by Clayton Eshleman, a click-through supply of Love Letters to Kiki Courage by Derek Finner, a number of playing cards you’ll need to flip over to read via Brent Hendricks, five Vladimír Holan poems translated by Josef Horáček and Lara Glenum, a St. Petersburg Hotel Series by Cathy Park Hong, U.S. Post Modern Office Homes Inc. comics by Matt Madden, a collection of Clément Pansaers poems translated by Michael Hays Sanchez, and an excerpt from Nathalie Stephens' Touch to Affliction.


Enjoy! (More soon)

"Nobody should need to know whether a poem is important or permanent before allowing him or herself to get renovated by it."[Click] to read the full article

"Nobody should need to know whether a poem is important or permanent before allowing him or herself to get renovated by it."

[Click] to read the full article

april fools is not fun y no moretext by Steve Roggenbuck
actionbookspress:

After a bit of a hiatus, we’re thrilled to announce that the newest issue of Action, Yes is on its way! We’ve been working on this one for a long time and it’s BIG: Penny Goring, Kim Hyesoon, Yideum Kim, Sara Tuss Efrik, Matthew Suss, Rebecca Loudon, Blake Butler, and many more. Stay tuned! We’ll be spending the next couple of weeks revisiting past issues of Action, Yes—including the one that started it all. MORE SOON!

actionbookspress:

After a bit of a hiatus, we’re thrilled to announce that the newest issue of Action, Yes is on its way!

We’ve been working on this one for a long time and it’s BIG: Penny Goring, Kim Hyesoon, Yideum Kim, Sara Tuss Efrik, Matthew Suss, Rebecca Loudon, Blake Butler, and many more.

Stay tuned! We’ll be spending the next couple of weeks revisiting past issues of Action, Yes—including the one that started it all.

MORE SOON!

Some footage of Ben Fama reading from Cool Memories in Seattle.

My friend Dominic is working on a new film project called We Are Monsters and I think you should check it out: “We Are Monsters is an offbeat horror movie and coming-of-age tale. It is told from the perspective of three young people that are independently transforming into strange, animal-like creatures. It is a dark, yet ultimately optimistic story about outsiders.”

actionbookspress:

Geoffrey Cruickshank-Hagenbuckle interviews Frederick Farryl Goodwin:FFG:"[I was under suspicion of murder when my mother died and there was a phalanx of trigger-happy policeman posted throughout the house. Her blood spray was on the kitchen wall and I was found upstairs in the artists loft of my parent’s house mute, writing suspicious things. So I’ve always connected writing with having a mortal consequence. The lab later confirmed the blood spray was from our dog whose tail had been cut from his neurotically chasing and biting it. McLean was a nightmare. Then, in my late twenties, after a morotcycle trip through Newfoundland and the Canadian Maritimes, I applied and matriculated at Brown. My first year I was advised by my beloved English Professor, Sears Jayne, the first performance poet I had ever seen though he was never called that by anyone to leave saying my needs were those of a graduate notundergraduate student. Either leave or ask John Hawkes who was there then and had written The Blood Oranges if I could study privately with him. I went to see Hawkes who was kindly and polite but told me I was a poet, not a fiction writer, and proposed that I study with Michael Harper as an alternative to droppingout. I followed his advice only to be told by Harper, after submitting a sample, that I was talentless and that hecouldn’t waste the time of his students or hisown by letting me join his class.]” [Click] to read the entire interview

actionbookspress:

Geoffrey Cruickshank-Hagenbuckle interviews Frederick Farryl Goodwin:

FFG:

"[I was under suspicion of murder when my mother died and there was a phalanx of trigger-happy policeman posted throughout the house. Her blood spray was on the kitchen wall and I was found upstairs in the artists loft of my parent’s house mute, writing suspicious things. So I’ve always connected writing with having a mortal consequence. The lab later confirmed the blood spray was from our dog whose tail had been cut from his neurotically chasing and biting it. McLean was a nightmare. Then, in my late twenties, after a morotcycle trip through Newfoundland and the Canadian Maritimes, I applied and matriculated at Brown. My first year I was advised by my beloved English Professor, Sears Jayne, the first performance poet I had ever seen though he was never called that by anyone to leave saying my needs were those of a graduate notundergraduate student. Either leave or ask John Hawkes who was there then and had written The Blood Oranges if I could study privately with him. I went to see Hawkes who was kindly and polite but told me I was a poet, not a fiction writer, and proposed that I study with Michael Harper as an alternative to droppingout. I followed his advice only to be told by Harper, after submitting a sample, that I was talentless and that hecouldn’t waste the time of his students or hisown by letting me join his class.]”



[Click] to read the entire interview

Tonight I caught a screening of Hitchcock’s Rear Window. It was my first time seeing the film as a member of an audience. It was very interesting to hear people in the audience gasping. To see people with their hands clasped over their mouths or sitting forward. To see people reacting these ways to something from 1954. American moviegoers—and too many American film students—don’t seem to understand that CGI does not necessitate suspense.

radioactivemoat:

Elizabeth Workman’s ULTRAMEGAPRARIELAND (Bloof Books, 2014)It’s not too late to pre-order it for $11!

radioactivemoat:

Elizabeth Workman’s ULTRAMEGAPRARIELAND (Bloof Books, 2014)

It’s not too late to pre-order it for $11!

boosthouse:

figuring out final design things for the yolo pages… this is the back/spine/front cover . (front cover by hunter payne.) we’re going to actualy add an ISBN /barcode to this design . can u believe. boost house and stev roggenbuck have never even purchased an ISBN until this day. but now it is time . hail satan
[this book is coming out april 8th. preorder to get your copy rite away]

boosthouse:

figuring out final design things for the yolo pages… this is the back/spine/front cover . (front cover by hunter payne.) we’re going to actualy add an ISBN /barcode to this design . can u believe. boost house and stev roggenbuck have never even purchased an ISBN until this day. but now it is time . hail satan

[this book is coming out april 8th. preorder to get your copy rite away]