PC IS NOT PC

Jun 24

actionbookspress:

Marty Cain writes, "The premise of Wet Land is almost impossibly weird: it’s a book-length response to the death of Lucas de Lima’s close friend Ana Maria, who was killed by an alligator. Written mostly in all-caps, the poems are delivered by a narrator who frequently takes the form of a bird, ruminating on Ana Maria, the gator, and the act of writing itself. Early on in the collection, de Lima describes the act of watching a televised reenactment of Ana Maria’s death: ‘IN THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTARY THE ACTRESS LOOKS/NOTHING LIKE ANA MARIA;/THE OTHER ACTRESS LOOKS NOTHING LIKE HER FRIEND.’ Here, de Lima sets the tone for many of the tensions that characterize this collection. It’s easy to criticize this kind of tasteless reenactment—to see it as a byproduct of a violent, media-obsessed culture. But in Wet Land, de Lima turns the lens on himself, exploring his own anxiety about being complicit in the reappropriation of tragedy.”[Click] to read the entire review

actionbookspress:

Marty Cain writes, "The premise of Wet Land is almost impossibly weird: it’s a book-length response to the death of Lucas de Lima’s close friend Ana Maria, who was killed by an alligator. Written mostly in all-caps, the poems are delivered by a narrator who frequently takes the form of a bird, ruminating on Ana Maria, the gator, and the act of writing itself. Early on in the collection, de Lima describes the act of watching a televised reenactment of Ana Maria’s death: ‘IN THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTARY THE ACTRESS LOOKS/NOTHING LIKE ANA MARIA;/THE OTHER ACTRESS LOOKS NOTHING LIKE HER FRIEND.’ Here, de Lima sets the tone for many of the tensions that characterize this collection. It’s easy to criticize this kind of tasteless reenactment—to see it as a byproduct of a violent, media-obsessed culture. But in Wet Land, de Lima turns the lens on himself, exploring his own anxiety about being complicit in the reappropriation of tragedy.”


[Click] to read the entire review

Jun 21

actionbookspress:

Jeffrey Angles reports, "A group of bilingual poets—Hiromi Ito, Yasuhiro Yotsumoto, Arthur Binard, and I—are doing a panel discussion on July 13 in Yamaguchi City about our project to translate into English the modernist poet, Nakahara Chuya, a figure often considered one of the fathers of Japanese modernist poetry. (Chuya was heavily influenced by symbolism and Dada, and he was one of the most important Japanese translators of Rimbaud.) This event will be hosted by the always wonderful Nakahara Chuya Kinenkan.”

actionbookspress:

Jeffrey Angles reports, "A group of bilingual poets—Hiromi Ito, Yasuhiro Yotsumoto, Arthur Binard, and I—are doing a panel discussion on July 13 in Yamaguchi City about our project to translate into English the modernist poet, Nakahara Chuya, a figure often considered one of the fathers of Japanese modernist poetry. (Chuya was heavily influenced by symbolism and Dada, and he was one of the most important Japanese translators of Rimbaud.) This event will be hosted by the always wonderful Nakahara Chuya Kinenkan.”

Jun 20

actionbookspress:

Lucas de Lima’s WET LAND (Action Books, 2014) has shown up on Dennis Cooper’s Mid-2014 Favorite Poetry Books list.

actionbookspress:

Lucas de Lima’s WET LAND (Action Books, 2014) has shown up on Dennis Cooper’s Mid-2014 Favorite Poetry Books list.

radioactivemoat:

Check out Natalie Lyalin’s featured poem, “Are You Crazy" via Fanzine

radioactivemoat:

Check out Natalie Lyalin’s featured poem, “Are You Crazy" via Fanzine

Jun 17

actionbookspress:

Johannes writes, "I want to follow up on James’s great post about Persona Peep Show with a post about the most obvious topic relating to the film: that is ‘fan-fictions’ or ‘kitsches’ Ingmar Bergman’s supposed Masterpiece Persona (a lot of the text is in fact from Bergman’s movie). What Mark Efrik Hammarberg and Sara Tuss Efrik pick up on in their remake of Bergman’s movie as “peepshow” is exactly the scandal of the image that James talks about in his post, the ‘peep-show-ness’ of Bergman’s movie. And like many fan fictions (this is why I’m drawn to this para-genre) it takes this elements and blows it up, pushes it out of balance, find the excess, the ghosts, the pornography in the masterpiece.”[Click] to continue reading

actionbookspress:

Johannes writes, "I want to follow up on James’s great post about Persona Peep Show with a post about the most obvious topic relating to the film: that is ‘fan-fictions’ or ‘kitsches’ Ingmar Bergman’s supposed Masterpiece Persona (a lot of the text is in fact from Bergman’s movie). What Mark Efrik Hammarberg and Sara Tuss Efrik pick up on in their remake of Bergman’s movie as “peepshow” is exactly the scandal of the image that James talks about in his post, the ‘peep-show-ness’ of Bergman’s movie. And like many fan fictions (this is why I’m drawn to this para-genre) it takes this elements and blows it up, pushes it out of balance, find the excess, the ghosts, the pornography in the masterpiece.”

[Click] to continue reading

actionbookspress:

Kim Hyesoon’s “Glass Cage" (trans. by Don Mee Choi) has been featured in the latest edition of Ampersand Revew

actionbookspress:

Kim Hyesoon’s “Glass Cage" (trans. by Don Mee Choi) has been featured in the latest edition of Ampersand Revew

Jun 13

actionbookspress:

James Pate writes, “Sara Tuss Efrik and Mark Efrik Hammarberg’s Persona Peep Show starts off with a close-up of lips inviting us into the video. The close-up reminds me of the famous shots of Isabella Rossellini’s mouth in Blue Velvet. The invitation includes phrases such as ‘Come to me,’ and ‘It begins now’ and ‘Are you ready?’ The video seems to be asking us to become the ‘you’ who is such a central figure in the piece, a ‘you’ that also seems to be the speaker’s ‘me,’ that which is in me which is deeper than myself, as Zizek might say, or, inversely, a ‘you’ that seems wholly other, alien, like the revenant figure with green hands and red sneakers that wanders through the woods halfway through the video, beating tree-trunks, humping them, placing masks on large broken branches and swirling them around. Or the ‘you’ in the early part of the video that is simultaneously doll, Adam and Eve, and Frankenstein.”[Click] to continue reading

actionbookspress:

James Pate writes, “Sara Tuss Efrik and Mark Efrik Hammarberg’s Persona Peep Show starts off with a close-up of lips inviting us into the video. The close-up reminds me of the famous shots of Isabella Rossellini’s mouth in Blue Velvet. The invitation includes phrases such as ‘Come to me,’ and ‘It begins now’ and ‘Are you ready?’ The video seems to be asking us to become the ‘you’ who is such a central figure in the piece, a ‘you’ that also seems to be the speaker’s ‘me,’ that which is in me which is deeper than myself, as Zizek might say, or, inversely, a ‘you’ that seems wholly other, alien, like the revenant figure with green hands and red sneakers that wanders through the woods halfway through the video, beating tree-trunks, humping them, placing masks on large broken branches and swirling them around. Or the ‘you’ in the early part of the video that is simultaneously doll, Adam and Eve, and Frankenstein.”

[Click] to continue reading

radioactivemoat:

Sara Woods has three new poems—“Dear Mouth Opening into a Yawn,” “Dear Juniper,” and “Winter Prayer No. 1”—in the latest issue of Sundog Lit.

radioactivemoat:

Sara Woods has three new poems—“Dear Mouth Opening into a Yawn,” “Dear Juniper,” and “Winter Prayer No. 1”—in the latest issue of Sundog Lit.

Jun 12

I reviewed Christine Wertheim’s mUtter-bAbel for The Fanzine:“‘waaa unnnnce upon a t t t time th th th’” The insistent pale day of pAge. The ashy, onamatopoeic gradations of Christine Wertheim’s mUtter-bAbel!—the post-hymen song’s exposure to the first light that veers itself into an infant’s eyes! The chaotic baby-babble pile-up of born and unborn betweenings of gender!—of female or male presence?—of what does our future hold? What is the cost of our network of Symbolic relations? What should readers make of this disheveled gash-environment of “s/he” noises persisting from behind a uterine curtain of crayonic impasto? Imperfect, our future? Hell yes! Imposters, future parents? Accusations will soar! (Like our world’s inevitable drone-increase!) Wertheim’s mUtter-bAbel is about our future. Our most current archaeology of knowledge as well as our TBD future-oriented archaeological endeavors.”[Click] to continue reading

I reviewed Christine Wertheim’s mUtter-bAbel for The Fanzine:

“‘waaa unnnnce upon a t t t time th th th’” The insistent pale day of pAge. The ashy, onamatopoeic gradations of Christine Wertheim’s mUtter-bAbel!—the post-hymen song’s exposure to the first light that veers itself into an infant’s eyes! The chaotic baby-babble pile-up of born and unborn betweenings of gender!—of female or male presence?—of what does our future hold? What is the cost of our network of Symbolic relations? What should readers make of this disheveled gash-environment of “s/he” noises persisting from behind a uterine curtain of crayonic impasto? Imperfect, our future? Hell yes! Imposters, future parents? Accusations will soar! (Like our world’s inevitable drone-increase!) Wertheim’s mUtter-bAbel is about our future. Our most current archaeology of knowledge as well as our TBD future-oriented archaeological endeavors.”

[Click] to continue reading

Jun 11

[video]

Jun 06

radioactivemoat:

Catch of the day! New poems by Stephen Danos in BOAAT VOL. 1

radioactivemoat:

Catch of the day! New poems by Stephen Danos in BOAAT VOL. 1

Jun 04

radioactivemoat:

Huge congratulations to Ginger Ko!—the very recent recipient of a Coconut Books Cargill Prize. This means that Coconut will be distributing her debut book of poetry: MotherloverGinger Ko studies at the University of Wyoming’s MFA in Creative Writing program.  Her poetry and reviews have appeared or are forthcoming in Anti-, TYPO, inter|rupture, and HTMLGIANT.She is originally from Los Angeles.Additionally, watch for more exciting new work from Ko forthcoming in the Fall 2014 issue of Deluge. We recommend this incredible piece in the meantime!

radioactivemoat:

Huge congratulations to Ginger Ko!—the very recent recipient of a Coconut Books Cargill Prize. This means that Coconut will be distributing her debut book of poetry: Motherlover

Ginger Ko studies at the University of Wyoming’s MFA in Creative Writing program.  Her poetry and reviews have appeared or are forthcoming in Anti-, TYPO, inter|ruptureand HTMLGIANT.She is originally from Los Angeles.

Additionally, watch for more exciting new work from Ko forthcoming in the Fall 2014 issue of Deluge. We recommend this incredible piece in the meantime!

actionbookspress:

[Here are some comments about Drew Kalbach's new book from Gobbet (the other books look great too). You may know Drew from his great critical blogging at The Actuary.]

actionbookspress:

[Here are some comments about Drew Kalbach's new book from Gobbet (the other books look great too). You may know Drew from his great critical blogging at The Actuary.]

radioactivemoat:

Check out David Blumenshine's poem “Forged" in the June 2014 issue of inter/rupture:these winter sicknesses shaken / off presupposed feathers mightrepresent / goose, perhaps geese / rubbernecking deaths

radioactivemoat:

Check out David Blumenshine's poem “Forged" in the June 2014 issue of inter/rupture:

these winter sicknesses shaken / off presupposed feathers might
represent / goose, perhaps geese / rubbernecking deaths

May 30

A new excerpt from Johannes Göransson’s The Sugar Book has been featured over at The Fanzine.

A new excerpt from Johannes Göransson’s The Sugar Book has been featured over at The Fanzine.