PC IS NOT PC

Jul 04

actionbookspress:

¡OMDiosa! Will you be in New York next Friday? Don’t miss the LATINA GURLESQUE @ THE BUREAU OF GENERAL SERVICE-QUEER DIVISION (FRI. JULY 11, 7:30 PM)Who let this “new grrly, grotesque, burlesque” poetics leak out of the border in a divine ooze of caliente pink?Monica McClure’s debut collection, Tender Data, will be published by Birds, LLC this year. She is the author of the chapbooks, Mood Swing, from Snacks Press and Mala, forthcoming from Poor Claudia. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Tin House, Jubilat, Fence, The Los Angeles Review, The Lit Review, Lambda Literary Review’s Spotlight Series, The Awl, Spork and elsewhere. She curates Atlas, a collaboration series of visual artists and poets, and lives in New York City.Lucas de Lima was born in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. He is the author of Wet Land (Action Books, 2014) and the chapbooks Ghostlines (Radioactive Moat) and Terraputa (forthcoming from Birds of Lace). A contributor to Montevidayo, he pursues doctoral studies in Comparative Literature at the University of Pennsylvania.Jennifer BARRRRFFFF Tamayo is a New York-based performance artist, writer, and activist. She is the author of three collections of art and writing, most recently YOU DA ONE (Coconut Books, 2014). JT lives in Brooklyn and serves as the Managing Editor of Futurepoem.

actionbookspress:

¡OMDiosa! Will you be in New York next Friday? Don’t miss the LATINA GURLESQUE @ THE BUREAU OF GENERAL SERVICE-QUEER DIVISION (FRI. JULY 11, 7:30 PM)

Who let this “new grrly, grotesque, burlesque” poetics leak out of the border in a divine ooze of caliente pink?


Monica McClure’s debut collection, Tender Data, will be published by Birds, LLC this year. She is the author of the chapbooks, Mood Swing, from Snacks Press and Mala, forthcoming from Poor Claudia. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Tin House, Jubilat, Fence, The Los Angeles Review, The Lit Review, Lambda Literary Review’s Spotlight Series, The Awl, Spork and elsewhere. She curates Atlas, a collaboration series of visual artists and poets, and lives in New York City.

Lucas de Lima was born in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. He is the author of Wet Land (Action Books, 2014) and the chapbooks Ghostlines (Radioactive Moat) and Terraputa (forthcoming from Birds of Lace). A contributor to Montevidayo, he pursues doctoral studies in Comparative Literature at the University of Pennsylvania.

Jennifer BARRRRFFFF Tamayo is a New York-based performance artist, writer, and activist. She is the author of three collections of art and writing, most recently YOU DA ONE (Coconut Books, 2014). JT lives in Brooklyn and serves as the Managing Editor of Futurepoem.

Jul 01

Ginger Ko reviews Bruce Covey’s Change Machine over at Fanzine: "I mean, everything is a part of the Change Machine world; there is the particularity of molecular lattices, industrial processes, apropos remarks, one-second memories, and they all manage to avoid any twinge of exclusiveness. There is something exciting about the evenly-paced Change Machine. There is no sinister overwhelming, there is Covey to catalogue and curate, to point out the hidden objects in the visual and psychic goulash. Covey’s poems sustain because it is not an apocalyptic piling-on of substances, it is a good-humored acknowledgment of the individual pecks that make up our pointillistic postmodern.”Ginger Ko writes from Wyoming. Her poetry collection MOTHERLOVER is forthcoming from Coconut Books.[Click] to continue reading

Ginger Ko reviews Bruce Covey’s Change Machine over at Fanzine:

"I mean, everything is a part of the Change Machine world; there is the particularity of molecular lattices, industrial processes, apropos remarks, one-second memories, and they all manage to avoid any twinge of exclusiveness. There is something exciting about the evenly-paced Change Machine. There is no sinister overwhelming, there is Covey to catalogue and curate, to point out the hidden objects in the visual and psychic goulash. Covey’s poems sustain because it is not an apocalyptic piling-on of substances, it is a good-humored acknowledgment of the individual pecks that make up our pointillistic postmodern.”




Ginger Ko writes from Wyoming. Her poetry collection MOTHERLOVER is forthcoming from Coconut Books.

[Click] to continue reading

Jun 26

radioactivemoat:

Felix Bernstein writes, “Series paints a destitute picture: a world that, in the end, bears no mother, no God, and no money. Yet nonetheless it is full of private enjoyments: filth, sex, grief, and poetry—enjoyments that are just as ‘edible’ as the world of market goods—’The only thing / I’ve eaten / in / the last / two days / is / a boy’s ass.’ This edible yet destitute world is offered in contrast to the world of the market, full of imperishable money that cannot rot, and likewise humans that are not permitted to die. His ethics derive from a concerted effort to live, ‘as a force,’ against this market, and as the person he ‘should be no matter how unimportant or unsustainable / he is.’ And that means being a force, and a person, who recognizes that biological death and rotting bodies are a reality that cannot be wiped away through belief in the transcendentally sacred grandeur of the market’s monuments.”[Click] to keep reading via Boston Review

radioactivemoat:

Felix Bernstein writes, Series paints a destitute picture: a world that, in the end, bears no mother, no God, and no money. Yet nonetheless it is full of private enjoyments: filth, sex, grief, and poetry—enjoyments that are just as ‘edible’ as the world of market goods—’The only thing / I’ve eaten / in / the last / two days / is / a boy’s ass.’ This edible yet destitute world is offered in contrast to the world of the market, full of imperishable money that cannot rot, and likewise humans that are not permitted to die. His ethics derive from a concerted effort to live, ‘as a force,’ against this market, and as the person he ‘should be no matter how unimportant or unsustainable / he is.’ And that means being a force, and a person, who recognizes that biological death and rotting bodies are a reality that cannot be wiped away through belief in the transcendentally sacred grandeur of the market’s monuments.”

[Click] to keep reading via Boston Review

actionbookspress:

Joyelle writes, “In his post yesterday, Johannes made an interesting observation in passing on the Thai setting of Nicholas Winding Refn’s widely reviled Only God Forgives:

Like Sylvia Plath’s “Fever 103″ it takes place in the orient, where imperialism discovered modern beauty in the 18th and 19th centuries. In Xanadu, Coleridge built an opium den…

One of the film’s obscenities is the obscenely patent Orientalism of Refn’s mise-en-scene. The film unfolds in a claustrophobic Bangkok-as-‘Chinatown’ , on sets reminiscent of The Lady From Shanghai, Death of a Chinese Bookie, and Polanski’s iconic so-named film in which Chinatown stands in for Hollywood’s Heart of Darkness, complete with reddish-green lights, drug haze, voyeuristic, curtained chambers, catwalks and corridors, sightlines which don’t match up, and theatrical spaces like operas, burlesque stages, go-go cages, boxing rings and nightclubs. The obscene is that which should remain hidden but is not; in Refn’s film, the latent racism of Orientalist tropes so common in Western film is right out there into the open, neither ironized nor dressed up as Keanu-ish spiritualism for the benefit of the Western individual’s soul.”[Click] to continue reading

actionbookspress:

Joyelle writes, “In his post yesterday, Johannes made an interesting observation in passing on the Thai setting of Nicholas Winding Refn’s widely reviled Only God Forgives:

Like Sylvia Plath’s “Fever 103″ it takes place in the orient, where imperialism discovered modern beauty in the 18th and 19th centuries. In Xanadu, Coleridge built an opium den…

One of the film’s obscenities is the obscenely patent Orientalism of Refn’s mise-en-scene. The film unfolds in a claustrophobic Bangkok-as-‘Chinatown’ , on sets reminiscent of The Lady From Shanghai, Death of a Chinese Bookie, and Polanski’s iconic so-named film in which Chinatown stands in for Hollywood’s Heart of Darkness, complete with reddish-green lights, drug haze, voyeuristic, curtained chambers, catwalks and corridors, sightlines which don’t match up, and theatrical spaces like operas, burlesque stages, go-go cages, boxing rings and nightclubs. The obscene is that which should remain hidden but is not; in Refn’s film, the latent racism of Orientalist tropes so common in Western film is right out there into the open, neither ironized nor dressed up as Keanu-ish spiritualism for the benefit of the Western individual’s soul.”


[Click] to continue reading

Jun 25

actionbookspress:

"The thorny terrain of the elegy is brought to focus in Marty Cain’s review of Lucas de Lima’s Wet Land (Action Books, 2014) at HTMLGiant.”

actionbookspress:

"The thorny terrain of the elegy is brought to focus in Marty Cain’s review of Lucas de Lima’s Wet Land (Action Books, 2014) at HTMLGiant.”

Jun 24

actionbookspress:

Marty Cain writes, "The premise of Wet Land is almost impossibly weird: it’s a book-length response to the death of Lucas de Lima’s close friend Ana Maria, who was killed by an alligator. Written mostly in all-caps, the poems are delivered by a narrator who frequently takes the form of a bird, ruminating on Ana Maria, the gator, and the act of writing itself. Early on in the collection, de Lima describes the act of watching a televised reenactment of Ana Maria’s death: ‘IN THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTARY THE ACTRESS LOOKS/NOTHING LIKE ANA MARIA;/THE OTHER ACTRESS LOOKS NOTHING LIKE HER FRIEND.’ Here, de Lima sets the tone for many of the tensions that characterize this collection. It’s easy to criticize this kind of tasteless reenactment—to see it as a byproduct of a violent, media-obsessed culture. But in Wet Land, de Lima turns the lens on himself, exploring his own anxiety about being complicit in the reappropriation of tragedy.”[Click] to read the entire review

actionbookspress:

Marty Cain writes, "The premise of Wet Land is almost impossibly weird: it’s a book-length response to the death of Lucas de Lima’s close friend Ana Maria, who was killed by an alligator. Written mostly in all-caps, the poems are delivered by a narrator who frequently takes the form of a bird, ruminating on Ana Maria, the gator, and the act of writing itself. Early on in the collection, de Lima describes the act of watching a televised reenactment of Ana Maria’s death: ‘IN THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTARY THE ACTRESS LOOKS/NOTHING LIKE ANA MARIA;/THE OTHER ACTRESS LOOKS NOTHING LIKE HER FRIEND.’ Here, de Lima sets the tone for many of the tensions that characterize this collection. It’s easy to criticize this kind of tasteless reenactment—to see it as a byproduct of a violent, media-obsessed culture. But in Wet Land, de Lima turns the lens on himself, exploring his own anxiety about being complicit in the reappropriation of tragedy.”


[Click] to read the entire review

Jun 21

actionbookspress:

Jeffrey Angles reports, "A group of bilingual poets—Hiromi Ito, Yasuhiro Yotsumoto, Arthur Binard, and I—are doing a panel discussion on July 13 in Yamaguchi City about our project to translate into English the modernist poet, Nakahara Chuya, a figure often considered one of the fathers of Japanese modernist poetry. (Chuya was heavily influenced by symbolism and Dada, and he was one of the most important Japanese translators of Rimbaud.) This event will be hosted by the always wonderful Nakahara Chuya Kinenkan.”

actionbookspress:

Jeffrey Angles reports, "A group of bilingual poets—Hiromi Ito, Yasuhiro Yotsumoto, Arthur Binard, and I—are doing a panel discussion on July 13 in Yamaguchi City about our project to translate into English the modernist poet, Nakahara Chuya, a figure often considered one of the fathers of Japanese modernist poetry. (Chuya was heavily influenced by symbolism and Dada, and he was one of the most important Japanese translators of Rimbaud.) This event will be hosted by the always wonderful Nakahara Chuya Kinenkan.”

Jun 20

actionbookspress:

Lucas de Lima’s WET LAND (Action Books, 2014) has shown up on Dennis Cooper’s Mid-2014 Favorite Poetry Books list.

actionbookspress:

Lucas de Lima’s WET LAND (Action Books, 2014) has shown up on Dennis Cooper’s Mid-2014 Favorite Poetry Books list.

radioactivemoat:

Check out Natalie Lyalin’s featured poem, “Are You Crazy" via Fanzine

radioactivemoat:

Check out Natalie Lyalin’s featured poem, “Are You Crazy" via Fanzine

Jun 17

actionbookspress:

Johannes writes, "I want to follow up on James’s great post about Persona Peep Show with a post about the most obvious topic relating to the film: that is ‘fan-fictions’ or ‘kitsches’ Ingmar Bergman’s supposed Masterpiece Persona (a lot of the text is in fact from Bergman’s movie). What Mark Efrik Hammarberg and Sara Tuss Efrik pick up on in their remake of Bergman’s movie as “peepshow” is exactly the scandal of the image that James talks about in his post, the ‘peep-show-ness’ of Bergman’s movie. And like many fan fictions (this is why I’m drawn to this para-genre) it takes this elements and blows it up, pushes it out of balance, find the excess, the ghosts, the pornography in the masterpiece.”[Click] to continue reading

actionbookspress:

Johannes writes, "I want to follow up on James’s great post about Persona Peep Show with a post about the most obvious topic relating to the film: that is ‘fan-fictions’ or ‘kitsches’ Ingmar Bergman’s supposed Masterpiece Persona (a lot of the text is in fact from Bergman’s movie). What Mark Efrik Hammarberg and Sara Tuss Efrik pick up on in their remake of Bergman’s movie as “peepshow” is exactly the scandal of the image that James talks about in his post, the ‘peep-show-ness’ of Bergman’s movie. And like many fan fictions (this is why I’m drawn to this para-genre) it takes this elements and blows it up, pushes it out of balance, find the excess, the ghosts, the pornography in the masterpiece.”

[Click] to continue reading

actionbookspress:

Kim Hyesoon’s “Glass Cage" (trans. by Don Mee Choi) has been featured in the latest edition of Ampersand Revew

actionbookspress:

Kim Hyesoon’s “Glass Cage" (trans. by Don Mee Choi) has been featured in the latest edition of Ampersand Revew

Jun 13

actionbookspress:

James Pate writes, “Sara Tuss Efrik and Mark Efrik Hammarberg’s Persona Peep Show starts off with a close-up of lips inviting us into the video. The close-up reminds me of the famous shots of Isabella Rossellini’s mouth in Blue Velvet. The invitation includes phrases such as ‘Come to me,’ and ‘It begins now’ and ‘Are you ready?’ The video seems to be asking us to become the ‘you’ who is such a central figure in the piece, a ‘you’ that also seems to be the speaker’s ‘me,’ that which is in me which is deeper than myself, as Zizek might say, or, inversely, a ‘you’ that seems wholly other, alien, like the revenant figure with green hands and red sneakers that wanders through the woods halfway through the video, beating tree-trunks, humping them, placing masks on large broken branches and swirling them around. Or the ‘you’ in the early part of the video that is simultaneously doll, Adam and Eve, and Frankenstein.”[Click] to continue reading

actionbookspress:

James Pate writes, “Sara Tuss Efrik and Mark Efrik Hammarberg’s Persona Peep Show starts off with a close-up of lips inviting us into the video. The close-up reminds me of the famous shots of Isabella Rossellini’s mouth in Blue Velvet. The invitation includes phrases such as ‘Come to me,’ and ‘It begins now’ and ‘Are you ready?’ The video seems to be asking us to become the ‘you’ who is such a central figure in the piece, a ‘you’ that also seems to be the speaker’s ‘me,’ that which is in me which is deeper than myself, as Zizek might say, or, inversely, a ‘you’ that seems wholly other, alien, like the revenant figure with green hands and red sneakers that wanders through the woods halfway through the video, beating tree-trunks, humping them, placing masks on large broken branches and swirling them around. Or the ‘you’ in the early part of the video that is simultaneously doll, Adam and Eve, and Frankenstein.”

[Click] to continue reading

radioactivemoat:

Sara Woods has three new poems—“Dear Mouth Opening into a Yawn,” “Dear Juniper,” and “Winter Prayer No. 1”—in the latest issue of Sundog Lit.

radioactivemoat:

Sara Woods has three new poems—“Dear Mouth Opening into a Yawn,” “Dear Juniper,” and “Winter Prayer No. 1”—in the latest issue of Sundog Lit.

Jun 12

I reviewed Christine Wertheim’s mUtter-bAbel for The Fanzine:“‘waaa unnnnce upon a t t t time th th th’” The insistent pale day of pAge. The ashy, onamatopoeic gradations of Christine Wertheim’s mUtter-bAbel!—the post-hymen song’s exposure to the first light that veers itself into an infant’s eyes! The chaotic baby-babble pile-up of born and unborn betweenings of gender!—of female or male presence?—of what does our future hold? What is the cost of our network of Symbolic relations? What should readers make of this disheveled gash-environment of “s/he” noises persisting from behind a uterine curtain of crayonic impasto? Imperfect, our future? Hell yes! Imposters, future parents? Accusations will soar! (Like our world’s inevitable drone-increase!) Wertheim’s mUtter-bAbel is about our future. Our most current archaeology of knowledge as well as our TBD future-oriented archaeological endeavors.”[Click] to continue reading

I reviewed Christine Wertheim’s mUtter-bAbel for The Fanzine:

“‘waaa unnnnce upon a t t t time th th th’” The insistent pale day of pAge. The ashy, onamatopoeic gradations of Christine Wertheim’s mUtter-bAbel!—the post-hymen song’s exposure to the first light that veers itself into an infant’s eyes! The chaotic baby-babble pile-up of born and unborn betweenings of gender!—of female or male presence?—of what does our future hold? What is the cost of our network of Symbolic relations? What should readers make of this disheveled gash-environment of “s/he” noises persisting from behind a uterine curtain of crayonic impasto? Imperfect, our future? Hell yes! Imposters, future parents? Accusations will soar! (Like our world’s inevitable drone-increase!) Wertheim’s mUtter-bAbel is about our future. Our most current archaeology of knowledge as well as our TBD future-oriented archaeological endeavors.”

[Click] to continue reading

Jun 11

[video]