markcugini:

ACTUALLY—if you’re annoyed by my constant shouting about this women’s safety//rape, i suggest you keep fucking following me. and look inward. and think about what you’re doing to contribute to rape culture. and about what you’re doing with your body. and your brain. and…

actionbookspress:

"Zurita’s first book of poems Purgatorio was published in 1979 during the early years of the Pinochet dictatorship. An engineering student at the University of Federico Santa María in Valparaíso when the coup took place in 1973, Zurita was arrested, detained, and tortured. He spent six weeks incarcerated aboard a military ship holding 800 prisoners cramped into a space with the capacity for 100. As told to Daniel Borzutzky in a 2009 Poetry Foundation interview, Zurita was carrying a file, the poems that would become the book Purgatorio, when he was arrested the morning of September 11, 1973, and the arresting officers suspected his papers might include coded messages. The senior military officer who made the final decision about Zurita’s potentially subversive writings threw the poems into the sea. The book begins with these lines:

my friends think I’m a sick woman because I burned my cheek

And a few pages later:

My name is Rachel I’ve been in the same business for many years. I’m in the middle of my life. I lost my way.– (translated by Anna Deeny)

[Click] to read the full article in The Millions

actionbookspress:

"Zurita’s first book of poems Purgatorio was published in 1979 during the early years of the Pinochet dictatorship. An engineering student at the University of Federico Santa María in Valparaíso when the coup took place in 1973, Zurita was arrested, detained, and tortured. He spent six weeks incarcerated aboard a military ship holding 800 prisoners cramped into a space with the capacity for 100. As told to Daniel Borzutzky in a 2009 Poetry Foundation interview, Zurita was carrying a file, the poems that would become the book Purgatorio, when he was arrested the morning of September 11, 1973, and the arresting officers suspected his papers might include coded messages. The senior military officer who made the final decision about Zurita’s potentially subversive writings threw the poems into the sea. The book begins with these lines:

my friends think
I’m a sick woman
because I burned my cheek

And a few pages later:

My name is Rachel
I’ve been in the same
business for many
years. I’m in the
middle of my life.
I lost my way.–
(translated by Anna Deeny)

[Click] to read the full article in The Millions

radioactivemoat:

“I stood up, surprised to find how easy it was to stand. Sure, my knees were wobbly and the thread of my feet sort of unfurled a little—frayed ends splaying outwards from impact points, but where they did, I could feel an ant leg (for example) and one, two, three, four, five legs more when one whole ant stepped on my frays, and I remembered burning ants as a child one at a time or occasionally en masse, and I wondered whether this was malice. I tried to tisk, tisk my lips, but hadn’t that command any more. In fact, I needed to compose my face if I were going to try and act normal. For starters, the string of my nose was hanging down by my hips (a little saggy themselves). I lacked confidence in my ability to lug my gear, but an abandoned three-wheeled shopping cart nearby offered availability. What was the saying about one man’s trash? Oho!”[Click] to read the entire piece in Deluge No. 3

JACE BRITTAIN is an MFA candidate at the University of Notre Dame. “Shortcomings and goings” was inspired in fits and parts by Beckett’s immobile heroes and the assiduous energy of David Byrne’s immortal soul.

radioactivemoat:




I stood up, surprised to find how easy it was to stand. Sure, my knees were wobbly and the thread of my feet sort of unfurled a little—frayed ends splaying outwards from impact points, but where they did, I could feel an ant leg (for example) and one, two, three, four, five legs more when one whole ant stepped on my frays, and I remembered burning ants as a child one at a time or occasionally en masse, and I wondered whether this was malice. I tried to tisk, tisk my lips, but hadn’t that command any more. In fact, I needed to compose my face if I were going to try and act normal. For starters, the string of my nose was hanging down by my hips (a little saggy themselves). I lacked confidence in my ability to lug my gear, but an abandoned three-wheeled shopping cart nearby offered availability. What was the saying about one man’s trash? Oho!

[Click] to read the entire piece in Deluge No. 3



JACE BRITTAIN is an MFA candidate at the University of Notre Dame. “Shortcomings and goings” was inspired in fits and parts by Beckett’s immobile heroes and the assiduous energy of David Byrne’s immortal soul.

sarahjeanalex:

About a month ago, Sophia Katz told me she was raped by a former friend and roommate of mine when she visited New York this past May. Yesterday, she published a piece chronicling the sexual abuse she experienced that week, using a pseudonym for her rapist. I shared the piece on multiple…

(via liefplus)

Today, Luna Luna Magazine has featured an excerpt from my play in the making called Green Jouissance, in which I explore the cannibalistic reproductive cycle of the female praying mantis through the atmosphere of an ice hockey arena. "Every single light in the Ice Land Ice Arena turns on. Enter Iris, world-renown goaltender complete with a mean butterfly slide and goalholes one through five. She can cover them all, but it’s pre-season. Mating season."Thank you again to Lisa A. Flowers for publishing this excerpt!

Today, Luna Luna Magazine has featured an excerpt from my play in the making called Green Jouissance, in which I explore the cannibalistic reproductive cycle of the female praying mantis through the atmosphere of an ice hockey arena. "Every single light in the Ice Land Ice Arena turns on. Enter Iris, world-renown goaltender complete with a mean butterfly slide and goalholes one through five. She can cover them all, but it’s pre-season. Mating season."

Thank you again to Lisa A. Flowers for publishing this excerpt!

actionbookspress:

Don Mee Choi’s translation of Kim Hyesoon’s Sorrowtoothpaste MIrrorcream was just reviewed in Bookforum by Mia You. But some of the reviewer’s comments have left us scratching our heads:"Rotting, as well as bleeding, vomiting, and a whole slew of other discomfiting gestures, is a well-established motif in Kim’s earlier writing, and this gross-out sensationalism undoubtedly plays a role in her work’s traction with English-language readers, especially those looking to be edgy and current. Decades of shock art have taught us that there’s nothing more radical than effusive body fluids, and nothing more bourgeois than being squeamish about them."Hmmm, what should we make of this? Johannes writes, "I’m happy Kim Hyesoon is reviewed in Bookforum but I feel ambivalent about this review. I have written many essays and posts arguing against the kind of context-situated/limited discussion of works in translations that Mia You argues against here. But then she falls into pretty much exactly the same trap when she suggests that Americans who like Kim Hyesoon (or publish it!) are sensationalists who not aware of the dynamics of translation. That’s a pretty severe generalization"Joyelle writes, "So Kim Hyesoon’s work has legitimate traction in Korean patriarchal lit culture, but to try to learn from her to push against our own patriarchies is just faddish.. it’s not an ends but a means for Kim, but it’s just a faddish end for US readers…”And Don Mee Choi has also weighed in, writing, “I’m very happy to have Kim Hyesoon’s work reviewed in Bookforum. Mia You offers many interesting insights. I may be off on a wrong track but I couldn’t help picking up on her overwhelming tone of disapproval from Mia You about how she thinks KHS’ work has been received so far. As far as I know, even if Kim Hyesoon has been invited to various prominent festivals in Europe, she has never been a ‘representative’ of South Korean poetry. Just by the fact that she is a woman disqualifies her as a representative of contemporary South Korean poetry. When SJ Fowler asked her about the idea of being a representative of her country, KHS answered: I am a poet from the nation called, ‘The poet, Kim Hyesoon.’”Hopefully all this noise will provoke some further discussion regarding the way works of translation (or even American poetry) is necessarily bound to their “contexts” (ie the new historicist hangover). What do you think?

actionbookspress:

Don Mee Choi’s translation of Kim Hyesoon’s Sorrowtoothpaste MIrrorcream was just reviewed in Bookforum by Mia You. But some of the reviewer’s comments have left us scratching our heads:

"Rotting, as well as bleeding, vomiting, and a whole slew of other discomfiting gestures, is a well-established motif in Kim’s earlier writing, and this gross-out sensationalism undoubtedly plays a role in her work’s traction with English-language readers, especially those looking to be edgy and current. Decades of shock art have taught us that there’s nothing more radical than effusive body fluids, and nothing more bourgeois than being squeamish about them."

Hmmm, what should we make of this? Johannes writes, "I’m happy Kim Hyesoon is reviewed in Bookforum but I feel ambivalent about this review. I have written many essays and posts arguing against the kind of context-situated/limited discussion of works in translations that Mia You argues against here. But then she falls into pretty much exactly the same trap when she suggests that Americans who like Kim Hyesoon (or publish it!) are sensationalists who not aware of the dynamics of translation. That’s a pretty severe generalization"

Joyelle writes, "So Kim Hyesoon’s work has legitimate traction in Korean patriarchal lit culture, but to try to learn from her to push against our own patriarchies is just faddish.. it’s not an ends but a means for Kim, but it’s just a faddish end for US readers…”

And Don Mee Choi has also weighed in, writing,
I’m very happy to have Kim Hyesoon’s work reviewed in Bookforum. Mia You offers many interesting insights. I may be off on a wrong track but I couldn’t help picking up on her overwhelming tone of disapproval from Mia You about how she thinks KHS’ work has been received so far. As far as I know, even if Kim Hyesoon has been invited to various prominent festivals in Europe, she has never been a ‘representative’ of South Korean poetry. Just by the fact that she is a woman disqualifies her as a representative of contemporary South Korean poetry. When SJ Fowler asked her about the idea of being a representative of her country, KHS answered: I am a poet from the nation called, ‘The poet, Kim Hyesoon.’”

Hopefully all this noise will provoke some further discussion regarding the way works of translation (or even American poetry) is necessarily bound to their “contexts” (ie the new historicist hangover). What do you think?

radioactivemoat:

Drew Kalbach writes, "It’s time poetry embraces technology’s increasing influence and begins to come to grips with how these things actively change the way we exist on a day-to-day basis. The only worthwhile humanism now is an algorithmic humanism, one that meshes the human with data in an effort to understand how our self as information changes the structures of our lives."-from "Scale and Becoming Spectacle in Privacy Policy: The Anthology of Surveillance Poetics”

radioactivemoat:

Drew Kalbach writes, "It’s time poetry embraces technology’s increasing influence and begins to come to grips with how these things actively change the way we exist on a day-to-day basis. The only worthwhile humanism now is an algorithmic humanism, one that meshes the human with data in an effort to understand how our self as information changes the structures of our lives."

-from "Scale and Becoming Spectacle in Privacy Policy: The Anthology of Surveillance Poetics”

radioactivemoat:



Deluge
No. 3 also contains a second poem by Ginger Ko called, “Frenemy”.



GINGER KO writes from Wyoming. Her poetry collection MOTHERLOVER is forthcoming from Coconut Books.

H.I.We heard father’s voiceA low voice, ooooh, oooohMy little brother clung to me and cried out to me,Is he dead? Maybe he’s not?When I went to askMother went into the bathroom, caressed father, groaned, and gaspedShe came out smiling-from Wild Grass on the Riverbank (Coming Soon from Action Books)

H.I.

We heard father’s voice
A low voice, ooooh, ooooh
My little brother clung to me and cried out to me,
Is he dead? Maybe he’s not?
When I went to ask
Mother went into the bathroom, caressed father, groaned, and gasped
She came out smiling

-from Wild Grass on the Riverbank (Coming Soon from Action Books)

radioactivemoat:

I’ll miss coming home and kissingmy twinks when the workof twinks falls outof parlancewhen we grow paunchesI walked past the Nuyorican Poets Cafefor the first timeafter taking my clothes off fora mannerly photographerHe must not see manygirls with an ass like thisHe asked, “Can I say something sexist?”I could hear the echoes of woo girlsoutside of last night’s barsWhen owls say wooduring the daytimeyour bad luck ends thereDoom takes overThis is the end of your family lineAcross the border rainbow flags tatterThe mothers wearing clogspush listlessly against the willows wootheir babies woopast the yard of absencethe homeless lean-to long-goneI did something poetic todaywhen I faced the walland let him fire rapid shotsHe was famous in the 80sI don’t want to be an incubatorfor meaningI want to stick to the membraneand make some moneybefore the white owl curses my last beads
MONICA MCCLURE’s debut poetry collection, Tender Data, will be published by Birds, LLC in 2015. She is the author of the chapbooks, Mood Swing, from Snacks Press and Mala, published by Poor Claudia. Her poems and prose have appeared or are forthcoming in Tin House, Jubilat, Fence, The Los Angeles Review, The Lit Review, Lambda Literary Review’s Spotlight Series, The Awl, Spork, Intercourse, CultureStrike and elsewhere. She co-curates Gemstones, a girls-mostly collaboration series of new media artists and poets. She has performed at Cage Gallery & Pioneer Works. With Brenda Shaughnessy, she edited the anthology Both and Neither; Biracial Writers in America.

radioactivemoat:

I’ll miss coming home and kissing
my twinks when the work
of twinks falls out
of parlance
when we grow paunches
I walked past the Nuyorican Poets Cafe
for the first time
after taking my clothes off for
a mannerly photographer
He must not see many
girls with an ass like this
He asked, “Can I say something sexist?”
I could hear the echoes of woo girls
outside of last night’s bars
When owls say woo
during the daytime
your bad luck ends there
Doom takes over
This is the end of your family line
Across the border rainbow flags tatter
The mothers wearing clogs
push listlessly against the willows woo
their babies woo
past the yard of absence
the homeless lean-to long-gone
I did something poetic today
when I faced the wall
and let him fire rapid shots
He was famous in the 80s
I don’t want to be an incubator
for meaning
I want to stick to the membrane
and make some money
before the white owl curses my last beads





MONICA MCCLURE’s debut poetry collection, Tender Data, will be published by Birds, LLC in 2015. She is the author of the chapbooks, Mood Swing, from Snacks Press and Mala, published by Poor Claudia. Her poems and prose have appeared or are forthcoming in Tin House, Jubilat, Fence, The Los Angeles Review, The Lit Review, Lambda Literary Review’s Spotlight Series, The Awl, Spork, Intercourse, CultureStrike and elsewhere. She co-curates Gemstones, a girls-mostly collaboration series of new media artists and poets. She has performed at Cage Gallery & Pioneer Works. With Brenda Shaughnessy, she edited the anthology Both and Neither; Biracial Writers in America.

radioactivemoat:

Here’s an excerpt from Sade Murphy's Dream Machine (co.im.press, 2014)
55. Welcome to the dispersed air glimmered with diseases. Crows aghast waterwaysaway to the Himalayas. The new sewageage entombed off the map, soured slid belligerent. Emboldened adventure language shot out naked rats. Monsters skittered their marbles to glue, found Wall Street in West Virginia. Travelers plink and blam their pants suspected steam circled clawed gummy carnival critters. Trumped up wings diatribe. So it clones. You gone behold a moth.You can read two more dreams in the latest issue of Deluge.

SADE MURPHY is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame, where she studied Theology and Studio Art. Her poems have been published by Action, Yes, joINT, Revolver, and LIT. She currently lives and works as an artist in South Bend, IN. 

radioactivemoat:

Here’s an excerpt from Sade Murphy's Dream Machine (co.im.press, 2014)



55. Welcome to the dispersed air glimmered with diseases. Crows aghast waterwaysaway to the Himalayas. The new sewageage entombed off the map, soured slid belligerent. Emboldened adventure language shot out naked rats. Monsters skittered their marbles to glue, found Wall Street in West Virginia. Travelers plink and blam their pants suspected steam circled clawed gummy carnival critters. Trumped up wings diatribe. So it clones. You gone behold a moth.



You can read two more dreams in the latest issue of Deluge.

SADE MURPHY is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame, where she studied Theology and Studio Art. Her poems have been published by Action, Yes, joINT, Revolver, and LIT. She currently lives and works as an artist in South Bend, IN. 

radioactivemoat:

We’ll be highlighting a different artist who contributed to Deluge No. 3 every day!—beginning with the latest issue’s Featured Artist, Kim Vodicka. Above, you’ll find an excerpt from Vodicka’s poem, “Deluxe Dreamium,” and if you like what you’re reading, we encourage you to head [inside] the stormier parts of Deluge for two more poems (“Something Ratchet This Way Voms” and “Trash Fish”) as well as a couple of Vodicka’s NSFW porn collages (one of which partially appears on the magazine’s cover). "Feminist is next to godliness," Vodicka reminds us.KIM VODICKA is the author of Aesthesia Balderdash (Trembling Pillow 2012). She holds an MFA in creative writing from Louisiana State University (2013). Her artwork has been published in TENDE RLOIN, and her poems have been published in Shampoo, Ekleksographia, Dig, Spork, Unlikely Stories, RealPoetik, Cloudheavy Zine, TheThe Poetry, Finery, Women Poets Wearing Sweatpants, Epiphany, Industrial Lunch, Salt, Moss Trill, Smoking Glue Gun, and Luna Luna Magazine. Her manuscript, Psychic Privates, was a 2014 Braddock Prize semifinalist.

radioactivemoat:

We’ll be highlighting a different artist who contributed to Deluge No. 3 every day!—beginning with the latest issue’s Featured Artist, Kim Vodicka. Above, you’ll find an excerpt from Vodicka’s poem, “Deluxe Dreamium,” and if you like what you’re reading, we encourage you to head [inside] the stormier parts of Deluge for two more poems (“Something Ratchet This Way Voms” and “Trash Fish”) as well as a couple of Vodicka’s NSFW porn collages (one of which partially appears on the magazine’s cover).


"Feminist is next to godliness," Vodicka reminds us.


KIM VODICKA is the author of Aesthesia Balderdash (Trembling Pillow 2012). She holds an MFA in creative writing from Louisiana State University (2013). Her artwork has been published in TENDE RLOIN, and her poems have been published in Shampoo, Ekleksographia, Dig, Spork, Unlikely Stories, RealPoetik, Cloudheavy Zine, TheThe Poetry, Finery, Women Poets Wearing Sweatpants, Epiphany, Industrial Lunch, Salt, Moss Trill, Smoking Glue Gun, and Luna Luna Magazine. Her manuscript, Psychic Privates, was a 2014 Braddock Prize semifinalist.

radioactivemoat:

THERE’S A REASON THE ZINE’S CALLED DELUGE(THIS AIN’T YOUR PAPA’S PORN STASH)(NSFW 4 lyfe.) Yes, yes! No. 3 is live and lively! Take hold of an umbrella and any raft-like devices! Featured Poems & Porns Artist is the extraextraordinary Kim Vodicka!! Additional contributors include Chanelle A. Bergeron, Jace Brittain, Jamison Crabtree, Brooke Ellsworth, Josh Fomon, Leora Fridman, Elaine Hsiang, Drew Kalbach, Rauan Klassnik, Ginger Ko, Coop Lee, Rebecca Loudon, Monica McClure, Roberto Montes, Sade Murphy, Colin Post, Gary J Shipley, Ed Steck, Madeline Weiss, and Rachel Zavecz!!

radioactivemoat:

THERE’S A REASON THE ZINE’S CALLED DELUGE

(THIS AIN’T YOUR PAPA’S PORN STASH)

(NSFW 4 lyfe.)

Yes, yes! No. 3 is live and lively! Take hold of an umbrella and any raft-like devices! Featured Poems & Porns Artist is the extraextraordinary Kim Vodicka!! Additional contributors include Chanelle A. Bergeron, Jace Brittain, Jamison Crabtree, Brooke Ellsworth, Josh Fomon, Leora Fridman, Elaine Hsiang, Drew Kalbach, Rauan Klassnik, Ginger Ko, Coop Lee, Rebecca Loudon, Monica McClure, Roberto Montes, Sade Murphy, Colin Post, Gary J Shipley, Ed Steck, Madeline Weiss, and Rachel Zavecz!!

Here’s link to the book trailer I made for Gina Abelkop’s i eat cannibals (co.im.press, 2014). She discusses the trailer’s imagery as well. Arielle Greenberg writes, “In I Eat Cannibals, the spacey-smart, anxious-bold, seriously funny speaker plays every possible role—zoo animal, redhead, pioneer, corset, priest—opposite women who are crushes, heroines and BFFs. The poems channel like mediums at seances, and they time-travel (though admittedly mostly just to shop), drawing Dickinson and Sharon Tate into a contemporary world of ‘spiritually iridescent horror’ where the dominant mode of being is Complicit. ‘For what I’ve done / I’m sorry,’ Abelkop writes, ‘I do it / every day.’ Readers of this work are glad she does.”

Here’s link to the book trailer I made for Gina Abelkop’s i eat cannibals (co.im.press, 2014). She discusses the trailer’s imagery as well. Arielle Greenberg writes,

“In I Eat Cannibals, the spacey-smart, anxious-bold, seriously funny speaker plays every possible role—zoo animal, redhead, pioneer, corset, priest—opposite women who are crushes, heroines and BFFs. The poems channel like mediums at seances, and they time-travel (though admittedly mostly just to shop), drawing Dickinson and Sharon Tate into a contemporary world of ‘spiritually iridescent horror’ where the dominant mode of being is Complicit. ‘For what I’ve done / I’m sorry,’ Abelkop writes, ‘I do it / every day.’ Readers of this work are glad she does.”

actionbookspress:

"the marionettes of nossa aparecida, the flight of a tear, the ripping of the firmament, the caution of angels, the curvature of eggs, this is the annunciation a shell’s limits gives way to: yolk ebbing from marbled swans whose whiteness drains.o aryan glamour in my fist, not yet a woman, no longer a gull. my wing, your palm; your breast, my beak. your sockets i smother until they spume and give me fingers.”[Click] to pre-order Lucas de Lima’s  “chapbook of eco-vengeance against white civilization” from Birds of Lace

actionbookspress:

"the marionettes of nossa aparecida, the flight of a tear, the ripping of the firmament, the caution of angels, the curvature of eggs, this is the annunciation a shell’s limits gives way to: yolk ebbing from marbled swans whose whiteness drains.

o aryan glamour in my fist, not yet a woman, no longer a gull. my wing, your palm; your breast, my beak. your sockets i smother until they spume and give me fingers.”

[Click] to pre-order Lucas de Lima’s “chapbook of eco-vengeance against white civilization” from Birds of Lace