w/ poet & comrade Rachel Zavecz

w/ poet & comrade Rachel Zavecz

(Source: easybakemeth)

from David Lynch’s The Air Is on Fire

radioactivemoat:

Congratulations to Drew Kalbach! Gobbet Press plans to release his debut book, Spooky Plan, on May 6th. Drew Kalbach is from Philadelphia. He holds an MFA from the University of Notre Dame and writes about contemporary poetry and media for Actuary Lit. His work has appeared in or is forthcoming in Deluge, Fence, Tarpaulin Sky, Whole Beast Rag, and others.

radioactivemoat:

Congratulations to Drew Kalbach! Gobbet Press plans to release his debut book, Spooky Plan, on May 6th.


Drew Kalbach is from Philadelphia. He holds an MFA from the University of Notre Dame and writes about contemporary poetry and media for Actuary Lit. His work has appeared in or is forthcoming in Deluge, Fence, Tarpaulin Sky, Whole Beast Rag, and others.

"She’ll always be illiterate, since she can’t read the letters of the alphabet, but now she can read one character and knows that the alphabet isn’t the only system of writing in the world," from Yoko Tawada’s Where Europe Begins (Translated by Susan Bernofsky and Yumi Selden)

leaving kalamazoo

actionbookspress:

Dennis Cooper mentions Lucas de Lima’s Wet Land and Kim Hyesoon’s Sorrowtoothpaste Mirrorcream (Trans. by Don Mee Choi) in his latest installment of “4 books I read recently & loved" […] also included is Andrew Duncan Worthington’s Hot Dogs! and Jerome Sala’s The Cheapskates.

actionbookspress:

Dennis Cooper mentions Lucas de Lima’s Wet Land and Kim Hyesoon’s Sorrowtoothpaste Mirrorcream (Trans. by Don Mee Choi) in his latest installment of “4 books I read recently & loved" […] also included is Andrew Duncan Worthington’s Hot Dogs! and Jerome Sala’s The Cheapskates.

actionbookspress:

Lucas de Lima responds to a board member of VIDA with his Note on Gringpo Provincialism: 
"In the aftermath of my post on the baroque below, a board member of VIDA: Women in Literary Arts accused me of ‘reducing’ my issue to identity.
This person, who works for a key literary venue, said my focus on identity had ‘thoroughly’ persuaded them out of a line of thought that might otherwise have been interesting. They also quoted Marxist theory on me.
Too bad it wasn’t an isolated incident. This is a bias I encounter all the time in writers who claim to have supposedly ‘progressive’ politics.
Experimental U.S. poetry culture, especially, pats itself on the back for privileging some poets—the ones most legible in terms of their political causes—while ignoring others who sound like ‘strange almost English’ (another comment I fielded yesterday).
¿Pero que dices? Are we mongrels just too baroque to bear?
One senses an acute xenophobia in US-American poets’ underestimation of the relationship between identity and form, and the way aesthetics that have flourished outside the US get written out of the mainstream, the experimental, and the political.
Of course, this privileging of legibility and dismissal of the foreign must take turns waving the same tattered flag. As tendencies that work hand in hand, they exhaust gringo poetry at the twilight of a superpower, cornering it into its least visceral, mystical, and transformative space.
“North American experimentalism became a fine jewelry shop.” -Heriberto Yépez (trans. Guillermo Parra)
They’re the two sides of the avant-garde/mainstream exceptionalist comfort zone I’m calling Gringpo Provincialism.
A literary jingoism desperate for its baroque death.”

actionbookspress:

Lucas de Lima responds to a board member of VIDA with his Note on Gringpo Provincialism:

"In the aftermath of my post on the baroque below, a board member of VIDA: Women in Literary Arts accused me of ‘reducing’ my issue to identity.

This person, who works for a key literary venue, said my focus on identity had ‘thoroughly’ persuaded them out of a line of thought that might otherwise have been interesting. They also quoted Marxist theory on me.

Too bad it wasn’t an isolated incident. This is a bias I encounter all the time in writers who claim to have supposedly ‘progressive’ politics.

Experimental U.S. poetry culture, especially, pats itself on the back for privileging some poets—the ones most legible in terms of their political causes—while ignoring others who sound like ‘strange almost English’ (another comment I fielded yesterday).

¿Pero que dices? Are we mongrels just too baroque to bear?

One senses an acute xenophobia in US-American poets’ underestimation of the relationship between identity and form, and the way aesthetics that have flourished outside the US get written out of the mainstream, the experimental, and the political.

Of course, this privileging of legibility and dismissal of the foreign must take turns waving the same tattered flag. As tendencies that work hand in hand, they exhaust gringo poetry at the twilight of a superpower, cornering it into its least visceral, mystical, and transformative space.

North American experimentalism became a fine jewelry shop.” -Heriberto Yépez (trans. Guillermo Parra)

They’re the two sides of the avant-garde/mainstream exceptionalist comfort zone I’m calling Gringpo Provincialism.

A literary jingoism desperate for its baroque death.”

actionbookspress:

Lucas de Lima writes, "After mulling over Joyelle’s questions, I went all the way, adding to them. Why does Burt bother with the baroque in the first place? Instead of meeting the baroque halfway, why not come up with a more tailored concept (a la the Montevidayans) like the Gurlesque, the Necropastoral, or Atrocity Kitsch? Or even Burt’s own ‘elliptical poetry’ or ‘the New Thing’? Then it occurred to me just how important lack in the ‘Nearly Baroque’ may be. I think the ‘nearly’ of his taxonomy troubles it in ways that Burt doesn’t actually intend. In its admission to not quite living up to Severo Sarduy or Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, the ‘Nearly Baroque’ reads like the ultimate symptom of American literary provincialism.
 A provincialism the term itself takes to its limit, nervously marking it. As if the boundaries that prop up jingoist navel-gazing were finally being forced to dissolve.”[Click] for the full article

actionbookspress:

Lucas de Lima writes, "After mulling over Joyelle’s questions, I went all the way, adding to them. Why does Burt bother with the baroque in the first place? Instead of meeting the baroque halfway, why not come up with a more tailored concept (a la the Montevidayans) like the Gurlesque, the Necropastoral, or Atrocity Kitsch? Or even Burt’s own ‘elliptical poetry’ or ‘the New Thing’? Then it occurred to me just how important lack in the ‘Nearly Baroque’ may be. I think the ‘nearly’ of his taxonomy troubles it in ways that Burt doesn’t actually intend. In its admission to not quite living up to Severo Sarduy or Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, the ‘Nearly Baroque’ reads like the ultimate symptom of American literary provincialism.

A provincialism the term itself takes to its limit, nervously marking it. As if the boundaries that prop up jingoist navel-gazing were finally being forced to dissolve.”

[Click] for the full article

The Outsiders (1983)

"REAGAN says RONALD REAGAN a healthier, handsomer hair / in Jeris’ name, we pray: SHAMPOO WHIP! SO ECONOMICAL!"Photo credit: Joyelle McSweeney

"REAGAN says RONALD REAGAN a healthier, handsomer hair / in Jeris’ name, we pray: SHAMPOO WHIP! SO ECONOMICAL!"

Photo credit: Joyelle McSweeney

actionbookspress:

“Wet Land is anchored in the reality of de Lima losing his best friend in Florida after an attack by an alligator. The events of this attack, the unearthing of grief (through the Egyptian crocodile god Sobek), and the experience of being haunted all come together in this elegy.”via Jordan Scott’s “10 Small press Poetry Books You Have to Read in 2014”

actionbookspress:

Wet Land is anchored in the reality of de Lima losing his best friend in Florida after an attack by an alligator. The events of this attack, the unearthing of grief (through the Egyptian crocodile god Sobek), and the experience of being haunted all come together in this elegy.”

via Jordan Scott’s “10 Small press Poetry Books You Have to Read in 2014

radioactivemoat:

Two poems from Alice Ladrick via Word Riot

radioactivemoat:

Two poems from Alice Ladrick via Word Riot

Alfred Hitchcock’s Downhill (1927)

actionbookspress:

Wow! Molly Weigel’s incredible translation of Oliverio Girondo’s IN THE MOREMARROW (Action Books, 2013) has been nominated as a finalist for a Three Percent 2014 Best Translated Book Award:BALAÚA Of surge you of surrender of deaths alive in the lovesea he she loved all over your nectar skin of naked petal your soft full moon bihoneycomb breasts thick with erohoney hummings rhythms and tides your yous and more than yous so echo of my echo and their sudden shine igniting the most sacred crypt yours mine give me your Balaúa

actionbookspress:

Wow! Molly Weigel’s incredible translation of Oliverio Girondo’s IN THE MOREMARROW (Action Books, 2013) has been nominated as a finalist for a Three Percent 2014 Best Translated Book Award:




BALAÚA

Of surge you of surrender of deaths alive
in the lovesea he she
loved all over
your nectar skin of naked petal
your soft full moon bihoneycomb breasts
thick with erohoney hummings rhythms and tides
your yous and more than yous
so echo of my echo
and their sudden shine igniting the most sacred crypt yours mine
give me your Balaúa